This inaugural episode investigates why 400,000 people–and a band of kids from Boston–ended up at the All Ireland music competition in Sligo. With visits to Boston, Dublin, Clare, and Chicago, host Shannon Heaton digs into what the competition meant to all the kids, parents, and teachers who were involved in the qualifying round in New Jersey, and the big summer Fleadh in Ireland.

[FULL TRANSCRIPTS in English… and in Japanese BELOW!!!!!]

Meet young piper Cormac Gaj, teachers at Comhaltas Music Schools, concertina player Mary MacNamara in Tulla, and fiddle player Liz Carroll… and there’s a Yeats poem here, too, recited by Anne Marie Kennedy.

* * * * * * *

Special thanks to David Laveille and the nice pals at the Sonic Soiree for encouraging Irish Music Stories. Thank you to Matt Heaton for script editing and production music.

And please CLICK HERE if you can kick in to support this podcast!

* * * * * * * *

Music and Poetry Heard on Episode 01-Trip to Sligo
all music traditional, unless otherwise indicated

Tune: “The Tap Room” (reel), from rehearsal, circa 2009
Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar)

Tune: “Grupai Ceoil Theme,” Production Music made for Irish Music Stories
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

Tune: “I’m Waiting for You” and “The Magpie’s Nest” (reels), from The Banks of the Shannon, Green Linnet 1993
Artist: Seamus Connolly (fiddle), Charlie Lennon (piano)

Tune: “Heartstrings Theme,” Production Music made for Irish Music Stories
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

Tune: “Travel Theme,” Production Music made for Irish Music Stories
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

Tune: “The Imperial Set” (first tune is “Follow Me Down to Milltown”), from Live in Lisdoonvarna, (Torc Music, 2002)
Artist: Kilfenora Céilí Band

Tune: “Jennifer Molloy’s” (Jig), from From Tulla to Boston: Live at the Burren
Artist: Mary MacNamara (from the Trad Youth Exchange)

Tune: “Joe Cooley’s Reel,” from From Tulla to Boston: Live at the Burren
Artist: Tulóg and Realta Gaela (from the Trad Youth Exchange)

Tune: “Triumph Theme,” from Production Music made for Irish Music Stories
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

Tune: “High Part of the Road” (Jig), field recording made by Liz Carroll (1976)
Artist: Bridge Céilí Band

Tune: “Seamus Connolly’s” (Jig), from Traditional Music from Doolin Co. Clare
Artist: Kevin Griffin with Eoin O’Neill, Sharon Shannon

Poem: “The Song of Wandering Aengus,” recited in Kennedy’s kitchen
Artist: Recited by Anne Marie Kennedy
Poet: William Butler Yeats

 


(transcript) Episode 01 – Trip to Sligo

I’m Shannon Heaton, and this is Irish Music Stories, the show about traditional music, and the bigger stories behind it…. 

MUSIC: “The Tap Room” (reel), from rehearsal, circa 2009
Artist: Dan Gurney (accordion), Shannon Heaton (flute), Matt Heaton (guitar) …

like why 400,000 people–including a band of 8-15 year olds from Boston–would head to the “All Ireland Fleadh,” a contest featuring top traditional musicians from around the globe. 

Musicians like Cormac Gaj. 

Cormac plays flute and uilleann pipes (the Irish bagpipes) with a group of kids from Boston who competed in the 2015 All Ireland Fleadh: 

Cormac: It was massive! They took over this giant auditorium. There must have been at least 1500 people there. All there for this one competition. 

In this episode, you’ll hear more about Cormac’s experience in the big Irish music competition –and what it meant to him… and to all the parents, teachers, and peers that were in on the qualifying round in New Jersey, and the big All Ireland finals in County Sligo. 

MUSIC: “Grúpaí Ceoil Theme,” production music made for this episode
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar), 

I’ll also take you to Comhaltas branches (Irish music schools) in Boston AND in Dublin. And to Mary MacNamara’s kitchen in Tulla—that’s Mary’s little town in County Clare, where she teaches music and organizes exchanges between Tulla kids and young musicians like Cormac. 

And I promise–whether you already play the fiddle, or you don’t know anything about traditional music or dance–this story… and the amazing and incredibly charming people you’ll meet… well, it’s not just about Ireland and Irish music.

 MUSIC fades

But Irish music is where the story begins–and Cormac loves playing it. Now, his dad is from Ireland. But Cormac was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Playing music that came from Ireland is a big part of Cormac’s life. His family has taken him to countless Irish sessions (or music gatherings); and he’s met a lot of other kids through the local Comhaltas branch, which offers music classes at St. Columbkille’s Partnership school in Brighton, Mass.

 (playground noise) 

During the week, St Columbkille’s is a Catholic grade school. And for 6 hours every Saturday, it becomes an Irish music zone, for students of all ages.

 (sounds of walking down the halls, sounds of people speaking Irish) 

When you walk down the halls, you hear people speaking Irish. There are signs on all the classroom doors for the various instrument classes. 

(sounds of walking upstairs & group singing) (teacher: “good job! Let’s try that first verse again”) 

Shannon on tape: I’m right outside Mairin Ui Cheide’s room She teaches sean nos (or old style) singing here. So I’m walking in… 

Mairin: Hello! This is Shannon Heaton! Conás átá tú!! 

Some dude pokes head in: “I’m looking for tin whistle?” 

Mairin: Tin Whistle? Well, there isn’t a high whistler or a low whistler here! 

Dude: All right, I’ll ask at the Comhaltas office… 

I asked Mairin. as the Irish speaker in the room, to define Comhaltas: 

Mairin: Comhaltas means a gathering, or a group… it’s a gathering of everybody who’s interested in the Irish culture, be it whatever instrument or our traditional style of singing 

Shannon on tape: Is this serious business? 

Mairin: Oh, yes, very serious! And you teach children that there’s a WONDERFUL world outside of America’s got talent! Hahahah!

After I left Mairin’s class and bid adieu to the school in Brighton, I talked to Seamus Connolly. Seamus was named National Heritage Fellow in 2013, and he led a big event called the Gaelic Roots Festival. Later he served as Artist in Residence at Boston College for over a decade. 

And he can really play the fiddle 

MUSIC: “I’m Waiting for You” from The Banks of the Shannon
Artist: Seamus Connolly (fiddle), Charlie Lennon (piano) 

When Seamus first came to the States in 1976, he taught for the Boston Comhaltas, helping students prepare for the Fleadh, back before Irish music was searchable on the Internet. 

Seamus: I honestly do believe that Comhaltas are responsible for a lot of the great music being played today. And of course musicians, they interpret it in their own way. But they got the basis from Comhaltas. And I think Comhaltas are to be complimented 

Seamus is not shy to admit that competitions weren’t always his cup of tea. 

Seamus: When I was growing up competition-wise, I felt like I was boxed in very much. I felt like I had to adhere to a certain way of playing. But I suppose that has to happen to put somebody on the right track. And then you’re freer when you’re done with competitions, you know? 

But competitions are something to do. And they’re what brought Cormac and his peers together… working toward a goal, going through the process of preparation, traveling together. 

Competition or no, this is what sharing the music is all about for Seamus: 

Seamus: There’s a sense of closeness and camaraderie about all of it. It’s not all to be kept in a box. It’s to be shared with people, and we can all learn from one other. The friendships that we make in it, you know? So it’s the music that brings all of us together. 

MUSIC:  “Heartstrings Theme,” production music made for this episode
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar), Composer: Matt & Shannon Heaton 

Indeed, it’s brought a LOT of people together. There are now 420 Comhaltas branches all over the world. 

The head office is in Dublin’s Monkstown neighborhood. So I hopped across the pond from Boston to Dublin. My friend Lisa Coyne and I rented a car. In fact, our car rental guy reminded us with a wink to “DRIVE ON THE RIGHT!”

He gave us this moment. We both looked pretty puzzled, before he said “GOTCHA!” 

Man, Welcome to Ireland. NO car company would joke about the side of the road in the States.  So, we drove ON THE LEFT to the head Comhaltas office, just a few blocks in from the coast. 

music ends

(birds singing) 

Now, Lisa knows all about Comhaltas. Her kids play fiddle and accordion, and they’ve been in classes along with Cormac. Lisa herself has taught flute and whistle in Brighton.

When we arrived at Comhaltas HQ in Dublin, Lisa looked over the new trad releases in the store front. 

(more bird sounds and echo-y footsteps on the stairway) 

Administrator and Flute Player, Siobhán Ní Chonaráin took me up to the second floor. We chatted in a classroom with a massive ceiling. 

She talked about how Comhaltas has grown over the years: 

Siobhán: 1951 was the foundation of Comhaltas Ceoltóiri Éireann in Mullingar. There was a whole joining of people of likeminded ideals and commitment to the music. And it grew from that to the extent that it is now an international organization with 420 branches. 

So, Comhaltas is the institutionalized arm of Irish music. And one focus, for many of the branches, is preparation for the regional contests. First and second place provincial winners can go on to compete at the All Ireland Fleadh 

Siobhán: Well, Fleadh Cheoil na h’Éireann is a phenomenal undertaking. At its core, of course, we have the competitions. And all of these competitors come from the world over, having qualified from their various provincial qualifying Fleadhanna Cheoil. 

MUSIC: “Travel Theme,” production music made for this episode
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar), 

There are seven regional qualifying contests: four from the Provinces of Ireland, the All Britain, and two in North America (one in the Midwest, and one in the MidAtlantic, which is where Boston students like Cormac compete). 

Shannon on tape: And then what would be, say, a very popular event at the All Ireland?

 Siobhán: Obviously, the reputation and the whole awareness of the Senior CB competition: it’s a given that at this stage it’s seen as the accolade. 

(Guitar strums last chord) 

The Ceili BAND. 

It’s the Irish version of a big band. Formed in pre-amplification days, to play in dance halls, Ceili Bands feature fiddles, accordions, flutes, banjos, concertinas, uilleann pipes… all playing unison melodies, with a rhythm section of piano and minimal drum kit (with occasional woodblock). 

MUSIC: “The Imperial Set, from Live in Lisdoonvarna, (Torc Music, 2002)
Artist: Kilfenora Céilí Band with live dancing 

Ceili bands are still a big thing, and at the All Ireland Fleadh, it’s sort of like the figure skating of the Irish music Olympics. Once all the solo and duo contests and singing rounds have played out, participants pile into a big venue to take in the hotly contested Ceili Band championship. To see WHO will be knighted KING of the Ceili Bands that year. 

(I mean, when you see the photo of the 2015 All Ireland winners, the Shandrum Ceili Band from Cork, the guys are all wearing black pants, vests, and Chuck All Stars. And they have awesome haircuts. And the women are all wearing matching blue dresses. It could totally be an ad for a mobile phone network, only they’re all holding accordions and fiddles.) 

MUSIC ENDS with applause 

Siobhán: You know, we’re delighted that that competition has reached the profile that it has. An awful lot… a very large number of musicians and teachers, mentors and branches, would have been very involved in the Grúpaí Ceol competition for many years, which allows the potential of up to 20 people to take part instead of 10. 

The Grúpaí Ceol (which means music group in the Irish language) has a slightly looser format than the Ceili Band. Competitors have eight minutes to fill, however they choose. Instrumentation is up for grabs. There’s an emphasis on creativity. There’s room for more musicians, too. Up to 20 per group. 

MUSIC: “Grúpaí Ceoil Theme,” Reprise 

No matter the category, the competitors for the All Ireland Fleadh come from Comhaltas branches around the world. Overseas competitors who can’t make it to a qualifying Fleadh, can apply to be evaluated to compete. That’s how 2 groups from Tokyo came to the 2016 Fleadh. Independent musicians and schools can ALSO register to participate. 

MUSIC FADES

 After a few nights of tunes and hilarious reunions with friends in Dublin and Galway, Lisa and I moved on to County Clare, home of the rocky Burren wilderness area, the scenic Cliffs of Moher, and legendary musicians and music festivals. And surprisingly good coffee. 

We were on our way to see independent teacher and concertina player Mary MacNamara in Tulla. 

MUSIC: Jennifer Molloy’s” (Jig), from From Tulla to Boston: Live at the Burren
Artist: Mary MacNamara (from the Trad Youth Exchange) 

From her home in Tulla, Mary teaches concertina and prepares students to compete. She has help from Alan Kelly on flute, and her daughter Sorcha and Eileen O’Brien on fiddle. They follow Comhaltas rules, but they’re totally independent. 

And in addition to preparing students for the Fleadh, Mary also organizes music exchanges between her students in Tulla, and groups abroad–like the Shetland Islands, Norway, and Boston, with Cormac and his peers. 

I had a chance to speak with Mary and her husband Kevin about the Boston exchange in their kitchen. 

(MUSIC Fades) 

Lisa made tea in the background, and piped in from time to time, since she was the U.S. instigator for the Boston-Tulla exchange: 

(tea and background talking sounds) 

Mary: It was a great experience. Because for most of them, they would never have been out of the country before, certainly not in America. The best memories for them is being in the underground trains. And every day we had 3 and 4 of them to take. Trying to get 30 people on and off at the right time and right station, and we were constantly counting. They thought it was very exciting. 

Shannon on tape: You send them tunes, they send you tunes? 

Mary: So I sent off a bunch of sets of tunes. I sent to Lisa, and she sent me over another bunch. It is my job to make sure that the kids know the stuff; and it is her job to make sure it is given out to the individual teachers. So the first thing when they meet, whether it is in Boston or Norway or Shetland or wherever, they sit down and can immediately play together.

Shannon on tape: They have a common language? 

Mary: They have a common language. It’s the most important part of the exchange. Wouldn’t you agree, Kevin? 

Kevin: I would. 

Shannon on tape: And what about the Boston kids then coming here?

Mary: When they came here then, they were staying in Bodyke in the the middle of the countryside. We had a big 59-seater coach. The problem was getting the 59-seater coach down the little bog road to the cottages where we were staying. So all the Boston kids were looking out the windows saying look, there’s grass in the middle of the road, and the bus can barely fit! So from that to the underground in Boston. I think for both sets of the kids that was the thrill. The difference between both places, you know, the experience of how to get from A to B. 

MUSIC: “Travel Theme” Reprise 

Another highlight on the Irish side of the exchange was the trad disco that Mary set up for the kids. A local DJ spun Ceili Band albums, and all the kids did simple Irish social dances together. 

Mary: I organized the trad disco because I think dancing, it’s a great way for interaction. They’re all great musicians. But I find when people are sitting down playing in sessions, there isn’t much opportunity for interaction. So the dancing is a great way to get people up, dancing together, talking together, moving around the floor together. So they had learned some dances, but they were fun dances, like two-hand dances, and The Haymaker’s Jig. And it was okay if people went wrong, So that was a big hit, because the kids were freeing up with each other.

Lisa on tape: And actually, that was the cover of the album 

Mary: The cover of the album! 

That was Lisa. She was talking about the live recording the kids made at the Burren, one of Boston’s best-known Irish pubs. 

MUSIC: “Joe Cooley’s Reel,” from From Tulla to Boston: Live at the Burren 

Artist: Tulóg and Realta Gaela (from the Trad Youth Exchange) 

A few hours later, I asked fiddle player Rosa Carroll about the Irish side of the exchange. She’s one of the musicians on the album: 

Shannon on tape: What’d you think of the program? Did you enjoy it?

Rosa Carroll: Yeah, I loved it so much. We just had loads of fun. We did loads of activities, played in sessions, made great friends, which we still are great friends today. And then they came back to us in Feakle and Tulla. We did more concerts. We went to Bunratty… yeah, we just did loads of activities. 

After the activities and the concerts of the exchange, Cormac and his friends back in Boston stayed busy: 

Cormac: Well, what now what do we do? We’ve got all these tunes lying around. Might as well do something for those tunes that we had. So we just pulled together the group. 

They pulled the group together with a lot of help. With help from fiddle player Séan Clohessy, who coached the kids and arranged for them to compete in the Mid Atlantic Fleadh. 

Tin whistle player Kathleen Conneelly and other Comhaltas teachers chipped in. They helped prepare the Boston Grúpaí Cheoil. They’d enter in the U15 category-the Under 15 category for 12-15 year olds. But some of the kids weren’t even 12, so really some were punching above their weight. They called the group Realta Gaela, which is Irish for bright stars.  

MUSIC: Grúpaí Ceol Theme Reprise 

Now, taking a group down to NJ to compete… this was kind of a big deal for Boston. Unlike their competitors in Pearl River, NY and St. Cecilia’s parish in NJ, Boston didn’t have a track record of competing. 

Cormac: Anyway, so we figured we’d just head down there, just to meet some people. Just for the fun of it. 

Nobody expected Boston to win. They were in it for the experience and the learning. And the hotel pool. They’d worked hard in Brighton, but they also horsed around between classes. They jumped on gym mats stacked in the hallway. They acted like kids. They took breaks from the tunes. 

When fiddle player Liz Carroll was growing up in Chicago, she went to the Irish Musicians’ Association to play tunes. And to play around with other kids. I had a chance to eat blueberries in Liz’s kitchen, and hear a few stories about her early days with the fiddle.

 MUSIC:  “Heartstrings Theme” production music made for this episode
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar), 

Liz Carroll: My early memories are of going to a pub, and it was on Ashland Avenue, right off of 55th street. It had a pub on the first floor. And there were meetings of the Irish Musicians’ Association on the second floor. And I remember that there was a player piano on the first floor—very attracted to that. And going upstairs meant a round group of people playing. And I remember sitting in the back, of rather a dusty room with a wood floor. And people playing, and just picking out my fiddle and sitting in the back. I could put that fiddle away and run around for an hour. And I could hear a tune in the distance maybe that I kind of knew or I liked, and I could run up and take my fiddle out, you know and stay there for a while. Very nice existence, Shannon! Hahaha! 

END MUSIC 

As I traveled around Chicago and Ireland, I kept Cormac’s story in mind. From Chicago to Boston to Tulla… 

MUSIC: Travel Theme reprise 

…there are so many Independent teachers, and music clubs, and Comhaltas branches. And that’s where the sea of All Ireland competitors come from. There are groups from Australia, Luxembourg, Chile. And I imagine they all have their own stories—and rivalries.

 Here’s Cormac’s account of the day Realta Gaela competed in the MidAtlantic Fleadh. Remember, only first and second place winners go on to compete in the All Ireland. 

Cormac and I were talking at a holiday party; and at this point in our conversation, a few family members and friends had sat down to take in the story: 

END MUSIC 

Cormac: There were two other teams competing–two other bands. And they’re pretty big deals. They practice for pretty much the whole year, leading up to the Fleadh. We figured our band would be lucky to get third. 

They got up there, completely serious. One of them even had, like, a custom shirt for each one of them, complete with the name of the music school on the front and the back. (Laughter) 

Phoebe, Cormac’s mom: Yeah, and I think it’s the type of competition that if there are three teams, if you’re not good enough to be awarded third place, they will just award first and second. 

That was Cormac’s mom, Phoebe: 

Cormac: They don’t even have to give anybody anything. So we figured we’d just got there for the fun of it. Just play a few tunes and then leave.

 So, after we get up there and play, at least half the team leaves to go to the swimming pool. I stuck around for the awards. And when they announced one of the bands in third place, everyone looked at each other… we thought: did we actually get SECOND?  

And then they announced second place, you figured, oh that’s bad. Nobody got first! 

(groans) 

And… honestly, the whole place just exploded when they said that we’d gotten first!! 

Friend on tape: So, half of your people were still at the swimming pool at that point? 

Cormac: At least they’d changed. 

Phoebe: I think they had come.. but in the photo, a bunch of kids are in bathing suits. You know, in tee shirts and bathing suits, holding a tennis ball—because they were ready to go play. 

Shannon on tape: Hahaha! That’s so great! 

Yeah, it’s a great Bad News Bears story. But it doesn’t end there. The kids went on to raise money and try their luck in Ireland, where they’d face MANY more competitors. 

MUSIC:  “Triumph Theme,” production music made for this episode
Artist: Matt Heaton (guitar)

Irish musicians and teachers from all over the world–thousands of players-invest all this time preparing for the Fleadh. All this, and there’s no money in winning the competition. And the Comhaltas pay scale for teachers is, well, quite modest. So what drives people? I asked Cormac what he thought: 

Cormac: These people tend to find the competition, and the ones who aren’t interested don’t really… it’s not like anyone’s pushing them to go to the competition. They’re going because they want to compete against people and be the best. 

For many of the teachers who are passing on the tunes, it’s a mission. Here’s Boston singing teacher Mairin Ui Cheide again: 

Mairin: I think it’s incumbent upon me to give, like I was given. I was fortunate that I had come from a musical family that passed songs on for generations. So now it’s my turn to pass this on, because it IS important. 

END MUSIC 

Because Irish singing and instrumental tunes are commonly passed on by ear, directly from one player or teacher to the next, it is a pretty profound living link between the people who played the tune before, and people who are playing it now. In this way, it’s not so much about any one player or time period. It’s older. It’s bigger. 

Now, as charming and timeless as giving and handing down music is, sometimes Irish music is passed on less directly: 

MUSIC: “Grúpaí Ceol Theme Reprise” 

Mairin: I teach by ear, and then I send an mp3. After all it’s 2017! The Bard can’t travel to Cape Cod and Brighton and Braintree and Milton. It’d take me all day. So it’s much easier to send it via mp3. Then they can download it on all their devices. 

MUSIC ENDS 

And sometimes it’s even more remote than getting a sound file from your own teacher. Some people are learning songs and tunes from random YouTube videos. And remember, these guys can apply to compete, too. But they might not have the same context as, say, the Boston kids, who DO get to meet Marin in person on Saturdays, right? 

I asked singer Karan Casey what she thinks about learning traditional music in isolation. (You’ll hear a lot more from Karan next month, in our one on one Cuppa Tea chat.) 

Shannon on tape: And what about people learning it online? 

Karan: Yeah, absolutely! Any way you can. Any access, any way you can. You just have to go out there and really follow the threads and the streams. There’s great information out there. There’s people on Mudcat Cafe. They’ve all the different versions. They know more about it than I do! 

Shannon on tape: Yeah, you mean the MudCat online discussion group? That’s an amazing song database. You think it’s cool to get songs that way? Can you really learn online and in isolation? 

Karan: I mean, I do think if you can befriend someone–I had the privilege of befriending Frank Harte. And you know, if anyone wants to come to come to my house for a cup of tea and learn a few songs, they’re welcome. And that, you know, that’s the way it works. Of course do the stuff online. But I think if we can reach out to one another and establish more connection that way, it’s really good. 

So, most people who learn Irish music make connections. And unless you’re really learning in isolation and you never find a social context for your tunes and songs, you’re bound to meet people with a similar connection to the tunes, to the rules, to the conventions. 

There’s shared humor and respect for very particular details when you go deep like that. And when you go to a Fleadh, you’ll find a room full of people–the competitors, and also the onlookers, the parents, the judges… who are all in on the style and the prevailing fashions. 

Here’s Liz Carroll again. She’d started out at the Irish Music Association in Chicago; went on to win the All Ireland fiddle championship; and has this story about the finer points of woodblock playing, and what happened when one group of musicians went off book: 

Liz: There was a moment that I have on tape, actually. A ceili band had won in Ireland. I want to say it was the Bridge Ceili Band. So now they’re being presented. So on my little cassette tape, it’s “Winners: Bridge Ceili Band.” 

The band usually had to play a dance that night. But I think this was just the moment when they play a tune. They’ve just won, they’ve all grabbed their instruments, they’re up on the stage, and they start in. Couple of taps, and off they go. 

MUSIC: “High Part of the Road” (Jig), field recording made by Liz Carroll (1976) 

Artist: Bridge Céilí Band 

Liz: At the time, it was not cool to play the block. So, they go into the second part, and the drummer goes to the block. 

Shannon on tape: Hahaha! 

Liz: On the tape there’s this murmur, into a well, into a CHEER. It’s like one of the best things I’ve ever heard. That whole room knew. This is a room full of musicians, their families. Everybody knew when he went to the block. Hahahaha! 

END MUSIC 

That’s what happens when the village invests.

MUSIC: “Travel Theme” Reprise 

When everybody knows about the tradition, a woodblock can really convey something, because everybody’s bothered to learn about the music. And about the tunes. 

The tunes. The tunes, The tunes! There are so many tunes. And these Boston kids learned a lot of tunes….  

They took those tunes, and formed Realta Gaela. They took the group to the MidAtlantic Fleadh and enjoyed an unexpected victory.  They raised money and went on to the All Ireland Fleadh in County Sligo. 

So, how did the Boston kids do in Ireland? 

…. Well, in short, they didn’t even place. 

Shannon on tape: What was Sligo like? Were there lots of kids competing in the Grúpaí Ceol.

Cormac: Yes, it was massive. They took over this giant auditorium. There must have been at least 1500 people there. 

Shannon on tape: What was it like to be in that room with 1500 people? 

Here’s Cormac’s mom Phoebe again: 

Phoebe: Oh, the tension was so thick. Yeah. That atmosphere where I feel like people are listening for the mistakes. And to start to see other people giving the look, in the audience. It’s like, I can’t even enjoy it. 

Cormac: No one else we really knew from before was competing. 

But the Boston kids weren’t alone. Their friends from Tulla, the kids who had taught them some of their competition tunes were right there in that room. 

MUSIC: “Triumph Theme” Reprise 

Cormac: There were a bunch of people we’d met back in the exchange cheering us on.. just like a little speck out in the audience. 

So, was it worth all the effort and expense? I asked Cormac and his mom what they thought. 

Phoebe: I think it was nice to get to know the other kids, as well as the teachers, through the exchange program first. Where really was the focus on building community through music. And the competition was so clearly secondary. So, I think if the competition had come first that might have felt a little different. But starting with that was really nice 

Cormac: A lot of people compete, they get there for the competition, they compete, then after that you forget about it for another year. And that’s when you hang out with other people. Just go down to the pub for a session. 

END MUSIC 

Here’s Siobhán Ní Chonaráin from Comhaltas: 

Siobhán: It provides them and their parents with an opportunity to come to this festival with so many like-minded people and families, many of them much further on, in that sense of development. They are entering into a community. 

MUSIC: “Travel Theme” Reprise 

Back in Boston Mairin Ui Cheide talks more about that community feeling that grows by going to the Fleadh. 

Mairin: You can go across the Atlantic to Ireland to participate. And it’s an experience that’s forever with you. 

Shannon on tape: It’s not just about the competition 

Mairin: Oh, no! The competition is just the minor part of it. It’s the people you meet, the music you hear, and the relationships you build. And the community that you belong to after going to a Fleadh, it’s very different 

Shannon on tape: You’ve all been there… you’ve all run the marathon? 

Mairin: Yes, you may have been the slowest one in the marathon, but that’s okay. You finished! You reached your goal. You got to the end! And that’s what sustains you as a human being, to belong. And belonging in our community of musicians, especially Irish musicians…. You know, Ireland is such a small country, but the impact that its people has had all over the world, is… you know, you can’t contain it! It keeps growing, and growing, and keeps on growing. And it’s wonderful. And to start so young and to be part of that.. of the seedlings of that. I think, for me, I find it one of the most fulfilling things I do. 

Mary MacNamara back in Clare: I think it’s been the biggest pleasure for me in music, is the exchanges. 

Shannon on tape: And they’re fun for you? 

Mary: Oh, it’s great fun. I mean, I love travelling myself. And I love watching the kids have an opportunity to have a platform to perform. They live on this. 

Shannon on tape: And you do, too? 

Mary: Oh, yeah, I do. I often sit down… I mean, looking at those photos there this morning. My heart skips a beat when I open that Boston book and look at the photographs. And I think it’ll live with them. And when they’re older musicians they will go back and think about it. And we will always know each other, which is great. 

MUSIC: “Heartstrings Theme” Reprise 

By the time they were in that room in Sligo for the competition, the Boston kids had already been through a lot together. They’d formed a band. They’d held up a giant trophy wearing flip flops and damp hair. They’d ridden a huge bus on small Irish roads and navigated the Boston transit system. They’d developed friendships across the ocean. And the Grúpaí Ceol FORMAT was a chance to take what they’d learned and do their own thing with it. They got these old tunes from a concertina player in Clare, who’d learned it from older musicians.             

MUSIC END 

And then they arranged and sculpted the music in their own way (with guidance from their teacher Sean Clohessy). Here’s Seamus Connolly’s take on invention and innovation: 

Seamus: I think it’s important to remember the past, but we can’t stay locked in the past either. We have to move forward, particularly with traditional music, wherever it may be from. It’s a living tradition! And the younger people who are playing have to add to the music how they feel it should be interpreted, and give us something new. But at the same time we shouldn’t forget what the older people did, too—what they put down. But that was in their time. But now it’s 21st century, and there’s new people coming along. And it keeps it vibrant. It keeps it alive. And when I’m gone and the young people who are now playing it, when they become older, they will hear something different as well. So again, it’s very much a living tradition. And it should be that way. 

MUSIC: “Seamus Connolly’s” (Jig), from Traditional Music from Doolin Co. Clare Artist: Kevin Griffin with Eoin O’Neill, Sharon Shannon 

And at the end of the day, the Boston kids got to swim in the hotel pool! 

(Sound of SPLASH into swimming pool) 

This episode of Irish Music Stories was written and produced by me, Shannon Heaton, with invaluable assistance and musical contributions from Matt Heaton. 

My thanks to the incredible people I interviewed for this story, especially to Mary MacNamara and her husband Kevin who welcomed us into their home in Tulla. And to Paula Carroll, Anne Marie and James Kennedy, and Aidan Collins and Pauline and Sean: thank you for hosting us, and supporting Irish Music Stories. Thank you to Lisa Coyne for being a great traveling companion and sounding board, and to David Laveille for encouraging me to focus more on stories, and less on academic abstractions. 

You can head to IrishMusicStories.org to learn about the music in this episode, and to find links to videos of Realta Gaela performing in NJ and in Sligo. If you’d like to support the show, click on the donate button. Every little bit helps: it’ll help defray travel and production costs. And it’ll show me that this is meaningful to you, which means a lot of me.. To thank you for listening, this episode’s Coda features poet Anne Marie Kennedy, reading The Wandering Aengus by William Butler Yeats, to the accompaniment of a ticking clock. 

Poem: “The Song of Wandering Aengus,” recited in Kennedy’s kitchen
Artist: Recited by Anne Marie Kennedy Poet: William Butler Yeats


Irish Music Stories Podcast Episode 01: Trip to Sligo
Japanese Translation by Tomoaki Hatekeyama
https://celtnofue.com

アイリッシュ・ミュージック・ストーリーズ

シャノン・ヒートン

エピソード1  “スライゴーへの道”

伝統音楽はいかにして40万人の人と…ボストンの少年達のバンドを西アイルランドへ向かわせたのでしょうか。

今日登場していただくのは、メアリー・マクナマラ / マリーン・イ・キーダ / コーマック・ガイ / フィービー・ウェルズ / シェイマス・コノリー / シボン・ニ・コナラン / ローザ・キャロル / リッツ・キャロル / カラン・キャセイ / アン・マリー・ケネディの皆さんです。

————————————-

こちらはシャロン・ヒートン。アイリッシュ・ミュージック・ストーリーズです。伝統音楽とその後ろにあるもっと大きな物語をお届けします。

音楽:”The Tap Room”(リール)、2009年ごろのリハーサルから

アーティスト:ダン・ガーニー(アコーディオン)、 シャノン・ヒートン(フルート) マット・ヒートン(ギター)

例えば、どうして40万人もの人(ボストンの8歳~15歳の少年少女のバンドを含む)が「オール・アイルランド・フラー」、すなわち世界中のトップクラスの伝統音楽のミュージシャンのコンテストに向かったのか、などということです。

コーマック・ガイのような人達です。

コーマックは2015年のアイルランド音楽祭に出場したボストンの少年たちのグループで、フルートとイリアンパイプス(アイルランドのバグパイプ)を演奏しています。

コーマック:大勢いました。大きな会場を埋め尽くしていました。少なくとも1500人はいたに違いありません。みんなこのコンクールのためだけに集まっていたのです。

 

このエピソードでは、アイルランド音楽のコンテストでコーマックが体験したことと、それが彼にとって…ニュージャージーの予選とスライゴーで行われた本選に関わった親や先生や仲間にとって、何を意味していたかについて、聞くことになるでしょう。

音楽:“Grúpaí Ceoilのテーマ,”このエピソードのために作られたオリジナルBGM

アーティスト:マット・ヒートン(ギター)

作曲:マット&シャノン・ヒートン

またボストンとダブリンにあるアイルランド音楽家協会の支部(アイルランド音楽の学校)にもお連れします。それからタラにあるメアリー・マクナマラの台所にも。タラはクレア州にある小さな町で、そこでメアリーは音楽を教え、タラの子供たちとコーマックのような若い音楽家の交流を図っているのです。

そしてお約束します…あなたがすでにフィドルを弾いていても、あるいは伝統音楽やダンスのことを何も知らなくても、この話は…そしてあなたが出会う信じられないほど魅力的な人々は…ええ、アイルランドとアイリッシュ音楽だけの話じゃないのです。

音楽、フェードアウト

しかしアイリッシュ音楽がこの物語の始まりで、コーマックはアイリッシュ音楽を演奏するのが大好きです。彼のお父さんはアイルランド出身ですが、コーマックはマサチューセッツのケンブリッジで生まれました。

アイルランドの音楽を演奏することは、コーマックの生活の大きな部分を占めています。彼の家族は数えきれないほどのセッションに彼を連れていってくれて、地域のアイルランド音楽家協会の支部を通して多くの子供たちに出会いました。音楽家協会はマサチューセッツのブライトンのSt.コーランキル校で音楽のクラスを開いています。

(校庭のざわめき)

St.コーランキル校は、平日はカトリックの学校です。そして毎週土曜日の6時間、ここはあらゆる年齢の学生のためのアイルランド音楽の場所となるのです。

(廊下を歩く足音、アイルランド語の話し声)

廊下を歩くとアイルランド語の話し声が聞こえます。…教室のドアには様々な楽器のクラスの表示が出ています。

(階段を上がる足音。コーラスの歌声)

(先生:「いいですよ!最初のところをもう一度やってみましょう。」)

テープでシャノンの声:今、マリーン・イ・キーダの教室のすぐ外にいます。彼女はここでシャン・ノース(古いスタイル)の歌い方を教えています。入ってみましょう。

マリーン:こんにちは!シャノン・ヒートンさんね。お元気?

男の人が顔をのぞかせる。「ティン・ホイッスルを探しているのだけど。」

マリーン:ティン・ホイッスル?ここにはハイもローも吹く人はいないわよ。

男:わかった。オフィスで聞いてみよう…

アイルランド語を話すマリーンにComhaltasの意味を聞いてみました。

マリーン: Comhaltasは「集まり」とか「グループ」という意味です。アイルランドの文化に関心のある人の集まりです。楽器でも伝統的な歌い方でもね。

テープでシャノンの声:熱心なんですね。

マリーン:ええ、とてもね。子供たちにアメリカの外にも、才能豊かな素晴らしい世界があると教えるのです。ハハハ。

マリーンのクラスを出て、ブライトンの学校に別れを告げてから、シェイマス・コノリーと話しました。シェイマスは2013年に人間国宝に指名されていて、ゲール文化祭という大きなイベントを主催していました。後に10年以上にわたってボストン大学で招聘音楽家として勤めました。

彼はフィドルがうまいのです。

音楽:“I’m Waiting for You”( The Banks of the Shannon、グリーン・リネット1993より)

アーティスト:シェイマス・コノリー(フィドル), チャーリー・レノン(ピアノ)

1976年にシェイマスが最初にアメリカに来た時、彼はボストンのアイルランド音楽家協会で教え、学生たちがコンテストに向けて準備をする手助けをしました。アイルランド音楽がインターネットで検索できる前のことです。

シェイマス:音楽家協会は今日演奏されているこの素晴らしい音楽に功績があったと心から信じています。もちろん音楽家はそれぞれの方法で表現しますが、その土台となるものは音楽家協会から得ているのです。音楽家協会は称賛されるべきものだと思います。

シェイマスはコンテストが好きだというわけではないと認めています。

シェイマス:若い頃コンテストに向けて努力していて、何か型にはめられたように感じていました。特定の演奏法に従わなければならないと感じていたのです。でもそれは誰かを正しい道に導くのに必要なのだと思います。競争が終わったらずっと自由に感じるでしょう。

しかし競争は必要な物です。コンクールが…目的に向かって力を合わせ、準備したり一緒に旅行したりすることを通じて、コーマックとその仲間を1つにしたのです。

競争であってもなくても、シェイマスにとっては、これが音楽を共有するということなのです。

シェイマス:親しさと仲間意識があふれています。無理矢理に型にはめられるというのではありません。音楽は人と分かち合うもので、私たちはみんなお互いに学び合うことができるのです。音楽の中で築いた友情、わかるでしょう?私たちを結びつけたのは音楽なのです。

音楽:“Heartstringsのテーマ” このエピソードのためのオリジナルBGM

アーティスト:マット・ヒートン(ギター)

作曲:マット&シャノン・ヒートン

実際、音楽は多くの人を結びつけたのです。今では世界中の420都市にアイルランド音楽家協会の支部があります。

 

アイルランド音楽家協会の本部はダブリンのモンクスタウンの近くにあります。それでボストンからダブリンへ海を渡り、友達のリサ・コインと私は車を借りました。レンタカー会社の人がウインクして「右側運転ですよ。」と注意してくれました。

私たちは2人とも戸惑いました。そうしたら彼が「やったね!」と言いました。

アイルランドにようこそ。アメリカでは車関係の会社の人が車の通行する側のことでジョークを言うことなどありません。それで私たちは「左側通行」でアイルランド音楽家協会のオフィスまで数ブロック車を走らせました。

音楽終わる

(鳥のさえずり)

リサは協会のことをよく知っています。子供達がフィドルとアコーディオンを弾いていて、コーマックと一緒にレッスンを受けているのです。リサ自身はブライトンでフルートとホイッスルを教えています。

ダブリンの協会本部についた時、リサは店頭に並んだトラッドの新譜を眺めました。

(鳥の声。階段の足音)

理事でフルート奏者のシボン・ニ・コナランが2階へ連れて行ってくれ、大きな天井の教室でおしゃべりしました。

彼女は何年もの間に協会が発展した様子を語ってくれました。

シボン:1951年にマリンガーでアイルランド音楽家協会が発足しました。志を同じくし、音楽に傾倒する人たちがみんな集まりました。そこから発展して、今では420の支部を持つ国際的な組織になりました。

この協会は、アイルランド音楽の延ばした腕のようなものなのです。多くの支部にとって、活動の中心の1つは地域のコンテストに備えることです。地域の1位と2位の勝者がオールアイルランド音楽祭に参加できるのです。

シボン:アイルランドの音楽祭は素晴らしい事業です。その中心はもちろんコンクールです。出場者はそれぞれの地域予選を通って、世界中からやってきます。

音楽:“Travel のテーマ”  このエピソードのためのオリジナルBGM

アーティスト:マット・ヒートン(ギター)

作曲:マット&シャノン・ヒートン

地域の予選が7つあります。アイルランドの地方から4つ、ブリテン島で1つ、北アメリカで2つ(中西部と中部大西洋岸で、コーマックのようなボストンの学生はここで競います)です。

テープでシャノンの声:オール・アイルランドで人気のあるイベントは何でしょうか?

シボン:ああ、ケイリー・バンド成人の部の評判と知名度といったら。このステージでそれが栄誉と見られるのは当然のことです。

(ギターが最後のコードを鳴らす)

ケイリー・バンド

それはアイルランドのビッグ・バンドのことです。まだアンプが使われなかった時代にダンスホールで演奏するために生まれ、フィドル、アコーディオン、フルート、バンジョー、コンサティーナ、イリアンパイプス…がユニゾンでメロディーを演奏し、ピアノや最小限のドラムキット(時にはウッドブロック)がリズムを担当しました。

音楽:The Imperial Set リズデンバーナのライブから(2002年 トーク・ミュージック)

アーティスト:キルフェナラ・ケイリー・バンド、ダンスと共に)

ケイリーバンドは今でも大切なもので、オリンピックに例えるなら、アイルランド音楽のフィギュアスケートみたいなものです。ソロとデュオのコンテストと歌が終わった後、参加者は列をなして会場に入り、ケイリーバンドのチャンピオンを決める熱いコンテストを聞きに行きます。誰がその年のケイリーバンドの王者となるかを見るために。

 

(2015年の音楽祭の勝者、コークのシャンドラム・ケイリー・バンドの写真を見ると、男はみんな黒いパンツとベストを身に着け、チャック・オール・スターズを履いています。素敵な髪形です。女性はおそろいの青いドレスです。携帯会社の宣伝に使えそうです、みんなアコーディオンやフィドルを持っていますけどね。)

拍手で音楽が終わる。

 

シボン:このコンクールが今のような注目を浴びるようになって嬉しいです。本当に多くの音楽家や教師や指導者や支部が長年の間Grúpaí Ceol(グルーピキヨール)のコンクールに関わってきました。これは10名ではなくて20名まで参加できるグループです。

 

グルーピキヨール(アイルランド語で音楽のグループという意味)はケイリーバンドより少し規則が緩く、持ち時間は8分で楽器編成は自由。独創性に重点が置かれます。メンバーにも余裕があり、グループあたり20名までです。

 

音楽:“Grúpaí Ceoilのテーマ,” 

 

どの部門でも、アイルランド音楽祭の参加者は世界中のアイルランド音楽家協会の支部から選ばれて来ます。予選に参加できない海外のミュージシャンは審査を受けて参加することができます。東京の2つのグループはこの方法で2016年の音楽祭に参加しました。どこかに属していないミュージシャンやグループも参加申し込みができます。

 

音楽が消える

ダブリンとゴールウェイで友達と再会し、幾晩か音楽を楽しんだ後、リサと私はクレア州へ移動しました。バレンの岩だらけの荒野、風光明媚なマハーの崖、伝説的なミュージシャンやフェスティバル…。そしてコーヒーが驚くほどおいしいのです。

私たちは教師でコンサティーナ奏者でもあるメアリー・マクナマラに会いにタラに行くところでした。彼女は音楽家協会に属していません。

音楽:” Jennifer Molloy’s”(ジグ)From Tulla to Boston: Live at the Burrenより

アーティスト:メアリー・マクナマラ(Trad Youth Exchange)

タラの家でメアリーはコンサティーナを教え、生徒がコンクールを受けられるよう準備をしています。アラン・ケリーがフルートで、娘のソーカとアイリーン・オブライエンがフィドルで協力しています。彼らは音楽家協会の取り決めに従っていますが、完全に独立しています。

 

コンクールの準備に加えて、メアリーはタラにいる自分の生徒たちとシェトランド諸島やノルウェー、ボストンなどの海外のグループとの交流を図っています。コーマックとその仲間達もそれに含まれています。

ボストンとの交流について、台所でメアリーと夫のケヴィンと話す機会がありました。

(音楽消える)

リサは後ろでお茶を入れ、時々言葉を挟みました。彼女はボストン‐タラ交流のアメリカ側の責任者なのです。

(背後の話し声)

メアリー:素晴らしい経験でした。ほとんどの子供たちは、今まで国を出たことはなかったのです。少なくともアメリカに行ったことはありませんでした。子供たちの一番の思い出は地下鉄に乗ったことす。毎日3,4回は乗る必要がありました。30人を正しい時間に正しい駅で乗せたり降ろしたりする…私たちはいつも人数を数えていました。子供たちはほんとに興奮していました。

 

テープでシャノンの声:あなたが曲を送ったのですか?それとも向こうから送られてきたのですか?

メアリー:たくさんのセットを送りました。私がリサに送って、リサはまた別のセットを送ってくれました。こちらの子供たちがちゃんとわかっているか確認するのが私の仕事で、それが個々の先生に伝わっているか確認するのがリサの仕事でした。ですからボストンでもノルウェーでもシェトランドでも他のどこでも、彼らは出会うとすぐに座って一緒に演奏できたのです。

テープでシャノンの声:共通の言語があるのですね?

メアリー:ええ共通の言語です。それがこの交流事業の一番重要な所です。そうでしょ、ケヴィン?

ケヴィン:そうだね。

テープでシャノンの声:で、ここへ来たボストンの子供たちはどうでした?

 

メアリー:彼らはここに来ると田舎のど真ん中にあるブダイクに滞在します。私たちは大きな59人乗りのバスを持っていますが、問題はみんなが泊るコテッジへ行くには、59人乗りのバスで細い田舎道を通って行かなければならないことでした。ボストンの子供たちは窓から外を見て、「見て!道の真ん中に草が生えているよ。バスが道幅いっぱいだよ!」と言っています。そんなところからボストンの地下鉄です。どちらの子供たちにとっても刺激的だったと思います。2つの土地の違い、AからBへどう行くかという経験です。

音楽:“Travel のテーマ”

 

この交流のアイルランド側のもう1つのハイライトはメアリーが子供たちのために用意したトラッド・ディスコでした。地元のDJがケイリーバンドのアルバムをかけ、子供たち全員が一緒に簡単なアイリッシュのダンスを踊りました。

メアリー:私はトラッド・ディスコを企画しました。踊ることが触れ合いの素晴らしい方法だと思ったからです。彼らはみんな立派なミュージシャンです。でも座ってセッションしているだけでは、あまりふれあいの機会がないと思ったのです。ダンスは人々の気持ちを掻き立てるいい方法です。一緒に踊って、おしゃべりして、フロアーを動きまわる…。それでみんなは幾つかのダンスを習ってきました。楽しいダンスです。2人1組のダンスとか、The Haymaker’s Jigです。間違ってもいいのです。これは大当たりでした。子供たちはすっかり打ち解けたのです。

リサのテープの声:そしてこれがそのアルバムのカバーですね。

メアリー:あのアルバムのカバー!

リサが言ったのは、ボストンの有名なバレンというアイリッシュパブで子供たちが録音したライブレコードでした。

 

音楽:“Joe Cooley’s Reel”  “From Tulla to Boston: Live at the Burren”から。

アーティスト:Tulóg and Realta Gaela(トラッド・ユース交流から)

何時間か後で、フィドル奏者のローザ・キャロルにこの交流についてのアイルランド側の意見を聞いてみました。彼女もこのアルバムに入っているのです。

 

シャノンのテープの声:このプログラムをどう思いますか?楽しかったですか?

ローザ・キャロル:ええ、とても。本当に楽しかったわ。色々なことをして、セッションして、友達もいっぱいできたわ。今もいい友達よ。で、今度はあの人たちがアイルランドのフィークルやタラに来てくれたの。もっとコンサートして、バンラティーへ行って、ええ、色々なことをしたのよ。

交流事業の行事やコンサートが終わって、ボストンに帰ったコーマックたちは忙しくしていました。

 

コーマック:今度は何をするべきでしょうか。覚えた曲もたくさんあります。覚えてきたこれらの曲で何かしようと思いました。それでグループを作りました。

多くの助けを得てグループを作りました。

フィドル奏者のショーン・クローシーの力を借りました。子供たちを指導して、中部大西洋予選でのコンクールに向けて色々と骨折ってくれた人です。

ティン・ホイッスル奏者のキャサリン・カナーリーや他の音楽家協会の先生も協力してくれました。彼らはボストン・グルーピキヨール(Boston Grúpaí Cheoil)の準備を手助けしてくれました。彼らはU15に出願しました。12歳~15歳のカテゴリーです。でも12歳になっていない者もいました。実際彼らは実力以上に頑張ったのです。そのグループの名前はレルタ・ゲイラになりました。アイルランド語で「明星」という意味です。

 

音楽:Grúpaí Ceolのテーマ

 

さて、コンクールのためにグループをニュージャージーへ連れていくのは…ボストンにとって大事件でした。ニューヨークのパールリバーやニュージャージーのセシリア教区のライバルと違って、彼らには実績がなかったのです。

コーマック:それで、あそこへ行くだけなんだ、他のミュージシャンに会いに行くだけなんだ…と思うようにしました。遊びに行くだけなのだと。

誰もボストンが優勝するなんて思ってもいませんでした。経験を積むために、学ぶために参加したのです。それにホテルのプール。ブライトンでは頑張りましたが、一方ではレッスンの間にバカ騒ぎもしました。廊下に積まれた運動用のマットに飛び乗ったり、子供じみたふるまいもしました。音楽から離れて遊んだのです。

フィドル奏者のリッツ・キャロルがシカゴで育ったころ、彼女はアイルランド音楽家の集まりにフィドルを弾きに行きました。そこで他の子と遊ぶのも楽しみでした。私はリッツの台所でブルーベリーを食べながら、フィドルを習い始めた頃のエピソードを聞く機会がありました。

 

音楽:“Heartstrings のテーマ” このエピソードのためのオリジナルBGM

アーティスト:マット・ヒートン(ギター)、

作曲:マット&シャノン・ヒートン

リッツ:最初の頃の思い出はパブへ行ったことで、アシュランド通り、55番街からすぐのところにありました。1階にパブがあって、2階でアイルランド音楽家協会の集まりがありました。1階に自動ピアノがあって、とても気になったのを覚えています。2階に上がると輪になって演奏していました。木の床の埃っぽい部屋の後ろの方に座ったのを覚えています。皆演奏していて、自分のフィドルを取りだして、後ろに座っていました。フィドルを置いて、1時間も走り回ることもありました。それから遠くから曲が聞こえてきて、知っているような、好きな感じの曲で、私は走って行ってフィドルを取り上げ、しばらくそこにいました。いい待遇ね、シャノン。ははは…

音楽おわる。

シカゴとアイルランドを旅行して、コーマックの話を心に留めていました。シカゴからボストン、そしてタラへ…

音楽:Travelのテーマ

 

…多くの独立した教師と音楽クラブ、そして音楽家協会の支部がありました。それがオールアイルランドの参加者がうまれたところです。オーストラリア、ルクセンブルク、チリからのグループがありました。彼らはそれぞれ自分たちの物語を持っていると思います。みんなライバルでした。

中部大西洋大会でレルタ・ゲイラがコンクールに参加した時のことをコーマックが説明をしています。この大会の1位と2位だけがオールアイルランドに行けるのです。

コーマックと私は休日のパーティーで話していました。この時、いくつかのファミリーや友達が座って会話に加わっていました。

音楽おわる

 

コーマック:コンクールにはもう2組のバンドがいました。2つとも立派なものでした。音楽祭に向けて1年間しっかり練習していて、僕たちのバンドは3位に入れれば上出来だと思いました。

彼らは真剣そのものでした。1つのチームは胸と背中に音楽学校の名前を印刷したおそろいのシャツを着ていました。(笑い)

フィービー(コーマックの母):ええ、もしグループが3つあって、3番目が表彰される値打ちがないのなら、1位と2位しか表彰しないというタイプのコンクールだと思います。

これはコーマックのお母さん、フィービーです。

コーマック:入賞者がいないこともあるのです。だから僕たちはただ楽しんで来ようと…。何曲か演奏して、それで終わりでよかったのです。

それで、演奏した後で、少なくともメンバーの半分はプールへ泳ぎに行ってしまいました。僕はそこで結果を待ちました。そして3位が発表された時、みんなお互いの顔を見合わせました。…じゃあ、僕たちが2位なの?

それから2位の発表がありました。残念。今年は1位がないのだ!

(あー)

そして…本当のところ、僕達のチームの優勝が発表された時、会場が沸き上がりました。

 

友達の声:そのとき、メンバーの半分はまだプールにいたのです。

コーマック:少なくとも水着に着替えていました。

フィービー:みんな戻ってきたと思うわ。でも写真を見ると…多くの子が水着だったわ。Tシャツと水泳パンツで、テニスボールを持っている子もいたわ。テニスに行くところだったの。

テープのシャノンの声:ははは。それはいい!

ええ、「がんばれベアーズ」ね。でも、それで終わりではなかったのです。子供たちはお金を集めて、アイルランドで運を試すことになり、もっと多くのコンクール参加者と向き合いました。

 

音楽:“Triumphのテーマ,” このエピソードのためのオリジナルBGM

アーティスト:マット・ヒートン(ギター)、

作曲:マット&シャノン・ヒートン

世界中のアイリッシュ音楽のミュージシャンや指導者達、何千人もの音楽家が音楽祭のためにお金を出しました。音楽祭のためだけです。コンテストで賞をとってもお金が入るわけではないのです。音楽家協会が指導者に払うお金もささやかなものです。では何が人々を駆り立てているのでしょうか。コーマックにどう思うか聞いてみました。

 

コーマック:これらの人はコンクールを…、興味のない方は…誰かがコンクールに出るように押しているわけではないのです。他の人と競い合って、勝ちたいからコンクールに参加するのです。

音楽を次の世代に伝える指導者にとっては、それは使命です。ボストンの歌の指導者、マリーン・イ・キーダに再び登場してもらいましょう。

マリーン:私が与えられてきたように、今度は与えるのが私の義務だと思います。世代を越えて歌を伝えてきた音楽家の家系に生まれたことは、幸運だったと思います。だから今度は私が伝える番です。それが大切なことなのです。

音楽おわる

アイルランドの歌や楽器の曲は、普通耳で聞いて、演奏者や指導者から次の世代に直接伝えられるので、過去に演奏していた人々と今演奏している人々との間の深い生きた絆となっています。このように1人の奏者とか1つの時代とかの話ではないのです。もっと古い、もっと大きなものです。

 

同じように素晴らしく時代を超えたものでありますが、音楽を次の世代に伝えていくのに、直接でない方法もあります。

音楽:“Grúpaí Ceol のテーマ”

マリーン:私は耳から教え、それからmp3で送ります。何と言っても2017年なのですから!自分でケープ・コッドやブライトンやブレインツリーやミルトンへ行くことはできません。丸一日かかってしまいます。mp3で送る方がずっと簡単なのです。生徒は自分の機器にダウンロードできます。

音楽終わる

 

先生から音楽ファイルを受け取るよりも、さらに間接的なやり方があります。YouTubeから歌や曲を学んでいる人もいます。大切なことは、このような人たちもコンテストに出られるということです。でも土曜日ごとにマリーンに直接会っているボストンの子供たちとは、同じというわけにはいきませんね。

 

歌手のカラン・ケイシーに独学で伝統音楽を学ぶことをどう思うか聞いてみました。(カランからは来月Cuppa Tea chatでもっとお話を聞かせてもらいます。)

テープでシャノンの声:で、オンラインで学んでいる人をどう思いますか?

 

カラン:ええ、どんな方法でも学べます。どんな方法でも、どんなやりかたでも。そのサイトへ行って、スレッドをたどるだけです。多くの情報があります。マッドキャット・カフェにも多くの人がいます。それぞれ異なったヴァージョンを持っています。みんな私よりもよく知っていますよ。

テープでシャノンの声:オンラインのマッドキャットのグループですね。驚くほどの歌のデータベースです。そうやって歌を覚えるのはいい方法だと思いますか。本当にネットを使って独学で学べますか。

 

カラン:ええ、あなたが誰かの力になれたら…私はフランク・ハートの力になることができました。

もし誰かが私の家に来て、一緒にお茶を飲んで、何曲か歌を習いたいなら、喜んでお迎えします。そんな風になっていくのです。オンラインのレッスンもしたらいいと思います。でも、もしお互い手を伸ばして、もっと関係を深めることが出来たら、それは良いことです。

アイリッシュ音楽を学ぶ人々の多くは、人との関係を作っていきます。そしてあなたが本当に1人きりで学んでいて、その曲や歌のための社会的なつながりを見出だそうとしないのでなければ、その曲やルールや集まりに同じような関心を持つ人々と出会うことになるでしょう。

深く掘り下げて行くと、共通の気分、特有の細部に対する敬意があります。そして音楽祭に行くと部屋いっぱいの人々がいます…参加者、観客、親達、審査員…みんな華やかなファッションです。

 

再びリッツ・キャロルです。彼女はシカゴのアイルラド音楽協会から始めて、オールアイルランドのフィドルの部で優勝しました。ウッドブロックの演奏の細かな点について、そして1つのグループがウッドブロックを突然演奏し始めた時のことを話してくれました。

リッツ:テープにこんな場面が残っています。

あるケイリーバンドがアイルランドで優勝しました。はっきり言うと「ブリッジ・ケイリーバンド」です。彼らは表彰され私の小さなカセットテープには、「優勝、ブリッジ・ケイリーバンド!」という声が入っています。

その夜このバンドはダンスの演奏をすることになっていました。彼らが曲を演奏した瞬間だったと思います。彼らは優勝したばかりで、みんな楽器をつかんで舞台に上り、演奏し始めました。タップを踏んで、始まりました。

音楽:“High Part of the Road” (Jig)リッツ・キャロルの屋外での録音(1976)

アーティスト:ブリッジ・ケイリーバンド

リッツ:当時はウッドブロックをやるのはカッコいいことではありませんでした。それで彼らはセカンドパートに入って、ドラマーがブロックをやりました。

テープでシャノンの声:ははは!:

リッツ:テープではつぶやきが歓声に代わりました。こんなうれしいことはありませんでした。部屋にいたみんなわかっていました。部屋はミュージシャンや家族でいっぱいでした。みんな彼がブロックへ行った時わかっていました。

ははは

音楽おわる

これが村が投資した時に起こったことです。

音楽:“Travel のテーマ”

誰もが伝統について知っている時、ウッドブロックは何かを伝えることができます。なぜならみんなが音楽について知りたがっていたからです。曲についてね。

 

曲、曲、曲!本当にたくさんの曲があります。そしてボストンの子供たちはたくさんの曲を覚えました。

彼らはこれらの曲を持ち帰り、レルタ・ゲイラを結成しました。そのグループは中部大西洋支部の音楽祭で予想外の勝利を得て、彼らはお金を集めてスライゴーのオールアイルランド音楽祭に行きました。

アイルランドでは、ボストンの子供達はどうでしたか。

…実は、入賞もしませんでした。

テープでシャノンの声:スライゴーはどうでしたか。グルーピキヨールで競い合った子供たちはたくさんいましたか。

コーマック:大勢いました。大きな会場を埋め尽くしていました。少なくとも1500人はいたに違いありません

テープでシャノンの声:その部屋で1500人の人と一緒にいるのはどんな感じですか。

コーマックの母、フィービーです。

 

フィービー:緊張はすごかったです。あの雰囲気、みんなが間違いを見つけてやろうとしているみたいに感じました。聴衆の中にそんな雰囲気を見たら、楽しむことなんてできませんでした。

コーマック:コンクールに参加している人で、前から知っている人はいませんでした。

でもボストンの子らは孤独ではありませんでした。タラから来た友達、コンクールの曲をいくつか教えてくれた子供たちが会場に来ていました。

音楽:Triumphのテーマ

コーマック:交流で出会った子らが大勢応援に来てくれていました。ちょうど聴衆の中の小さな点みたいに。

あれだけ努力してお金をかけて、それだけの値打ちがあったのでしょうか?コーマックとお母さんにどう思うか聞いてみました。

 

フィービー:最初に交流事業で先生やほかの子らと知り合えたのがよかったと思います。音楽を通して関係を築くということに焦点が置かれていました。コンクールはその次なのです。

もしコンクールが最初に来たら、少し違ってきただろうと思います。でも、交流から始まったのが本当に良かったと思います。

コーマック:多くの人が競い合いました。みんな競い合うために集まったのです。競争して、その後は1年間は忘れているのです。そういう時に他の人と付き合うのです。パブへ出かけてセッションです。

音楽おわる

音楽家協会のシボン・ニ・コナランです。

 

シボン:子供達やその親にこのフェスティバルに来るチャンスを与えるのです。多くの同じような考えを持った人達、そしてその中の多くはさらに深いところまで行きます。彼らはこの「社会」に入るのです。

音楽:Travelのテーマ

音楽祭に参加したことで、コミュニティーという感覚はさらに大きくなりました。これについてマリーン・イ・キーダはボストンに戻って語っています。

マリーン:音楽祭に参加するために大西洋を渡ってアイルランドに行くことができます。そしてその経験は生涯自分のものになるのです。

テープでシャノンの声:コンクールだけじゃないのですね。

マリーン:ええ、違います。コンクールは経験の中のごく一部です。大切なのはそこで出会う人々、聞く音楽、そこで築く関係です。それから音楽祭に参加することで、あなたが所属することになるコミュニティー、それまでとは全く違ったものになります。

テープでシャノンの声:みんなそこへ行ったのですね。走り切った…

マリーン:ええ、一番とろい参加者だったかもしれませんが、そんなことはどうでもいいのです。やり切った!ゴールに飛び込んだのです!それが人間としてのあなたを支えるものです、所属するということが…。音楽愛好家の、特にアイリッシュ音楽の愛好家の社会に属すること…。アイルランドは小さな国ですが、アイルランド人が世界に与えるインパクトは…計り知れないものです。それは今も、絶えず拡大し続けています。そしてそれは素晴らしい。若い時に始めて仲間に入る、アイルランド音楽の若き仲間となる…最もやりがいのあることだと思います。

 

クレアに戻って、メアリー・マクナマラ:音楽におけるもっとも大きな喜びでした。この交流はね。

 

テープでシャノンの声:で、楽しかった?

メアリー:ええ、楽しかったわ。旅行が好きなの。そして子供たちが演奏する舞台を見るのもうれしいわ。子供たちはこれを生きがいにしているの。

テープでシャノンの声:で、あなたも?

メアリー:ええ、そうよ。私はよく座って…今朝もあの写真を見ていたわ。ボストンのアルバムを開いて写真を見ると、心臓がドキドキするの。

彼らの中で生き続けると思います。で、彼らが歳を取ったら、振り返って考えてみるでしょう。私たちはいつでもお互いに友達なの。それは素晴らしいことよ。

音楽:“Heartstringsのテーマ

 

スライゴーのコンクールの会場に着くまでに、ボストンの子供たちはすでに多くのことを一緒に経験していました。バンドを結成しました。ビーチサンダルを履いて濡れた髪で大きなトロフィーを高々と掲げました。アイルランドの細い道で大きなバスに乗り、ボストンの交通システムを案内しました。彼らは大西洋を挟んだ友情を築きました。グルーピキヨールの形式は、学んできたことをつかみ取り、自分たちの音楽をするチャンスでした。彼らはこれらの古い曲をクレアのコンサティーナ奏者から教えてもらいました。その人もさらに上の世代から習っているのです。

 

音楽終わる

彼らは音楽を自分たちなりのやり方でアレンジし、作り上げました。(先生のショーン・クローシーの指導で)… シェイマス・コノリーの創案と刷新に関する意見です。

シェイマス:過去を覚えておくのは大切だと思います。しかし過去に留まっていることはできません。特に伝統音楽においては、それがどこのものであれ、前に進まなければならないのです。生きている伝統なのです。演奏する若い人々はどう解釈するべきか自分たちが感じたままを付け加え、何か新しいものを表現しなければなりません。しかし同時に過去の人々がしたことも忘れてはならないのです。でもそれは彼らの時代のことです。今は21世紀で、また新しい人々が生まれています。それが伝統音楽に活気を与えます。生き生きとさせるのです。私が逝ってしまって、今演奏している若い人々、彼らが歳をとったら、またちょっと違ったものを聞くのです。もう一度言いますが、それは生きている伝統なのです。そうでなければなりません。

音楽:“Seamus Connolly’s”(ジグ)クレア州、ドゥーリンの伝統音楽から

アーティスト:ケビン・グリフィン with エオイン・オニール、シャロン・シャノン

その日の終わりにボストンの子達はホテルのプールで泳ぎに行きました! 

(プールに飛び込む水音)

このアイリッシュ・ミュージック・ストーリーズのエピソードは、マット・ヒートンの計り知れない助力と音楽的貢献を受けて、私、シャノン・ヒートンが書いて、プロデュースしています。

この話のためにインタビューした素晴らしい人々、とりわけメアリー・マクナマラとご主人のケビンに感謝します。おふたりにはタラのお宅にお招きいただきました。ポーラ・キャロル、アン・マリー、ジェイムズ・ケネディー、そしてエイダン・コリンズとポーリンとショーン、おもてなし、アイリッシュ・ミュージック・ストーリーズへのサポート、ありがとうございました。リサ・コリンズ、一緒に旅行してくれて、また相談に乗ってくれてありがとう。デイビッド・ラヴェル、抽象的な学問的なものより物語に焦点を当てるように背中を押してくれてありがとうございました。

このエピソードで使われた曲について知りたい方、レルタ・ゲイラのニュージャージーとスライゴーの動画のリンクを見たい方はIrishMusicStories.orgにアクセスください。このポッドキャストを支援してくださる方は「寄付」のボタンをクリックしてください。わずかなご支援でも役に立ちます。旅費や制作の費用になります。それに、これがあなたに役に立ったということがわかり、励みになります。ご視聴ありがとうございました。このエピソードの終わりに詩人アン・マリー・ケネディがウィリアム・バトラー・イェーツの「さまよえるアンガス」を朗読します。

詩:「さまよえるアンガスの歌」ケネディ家の台所で朗読

アーティスト:朗読、アン・マリー・ケネディ

作詞:ウィリアム・バトラー・イェーツ